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for us to do with medicare in particular is to lower health-care costs. but when it comes to social security, as i said, you don't need a major structural change in order to make sure that social security is there for the future. >> will follow up on this. first, governor romney, you have two minutes on social security and entitlements. >> well, jim, our seniors depend on these programs, and i know anytime we talk about entitlements, people become concerned that something's got to happen that's going to change their life for the worse. the answer is neither the president nor i are proposing any changes for current retirees or near retirees, either to social security or medi-scare. so if you're 60 or run 60 or older, you don't need to listen any further. but for younger people, we need to talk about what changes are going to be occurring. all, i just thought about one bit that is, in fact, i was wrong when i said the president isn't proposing any changes for current retirees. in fact, he is on medicare put on social security he's not. but on medicare, for current retirees, he's cutti
down, and over the last two years, healthcare premiums have gone up, it's true but slower than any time in the last 50 years. so we're already beginning to see progress in the meantime folks out there with insurance you are already getting a rebate. governor romney says we are going to replace it with something. but he hasn't described what we would replace it with, other than saying we're going to leave it to the state. the fact of the matter is that some of the prescriptions that he has offered there's no indication that that is going to help somebody who has a preexisting condition able to buy insurance. by repealing health care you -- >> let's let the governor explain how you would replace it? >> romney: number one preexisting conditions are covered under my mine. number two young people are able to stay on their own plan. and let's come back to something we agree on, which is the key task we have in health care is to get the costs down so it's more affordable for families and then he has a model for doing that a board of people at the government appoi
was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. she's "time's" assistant managing editor. rana, i wonder what you thought about the two candidates as they talked about the economy. how did their plans measure up against each other? >> i think the key issue is taxes and i think you have to wonder whether romney's math adds up. i think we're still left really wondering about a lot of details, about how this plan is going to garner the revenue he's talking about. i think we still don't know what sort of loopholes are going to be closed. and whether or not the math can be made to work without opening up contentious loopholes like the mortgage interest deduction. but i think there's a biggest math issue here and that's whether or not lowering tax rates creates jobs
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

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